High turnout at High Park Residences Launch

The sales gallery for High Park Residences was filled to the brim as 8,000 people came to view and 500 deposits were made for the 1,390 units. The previous prediction for the number of units to be developed in the site near Thanggam LRT station and the new Seletar Mall was only 1,130 but the developers, CEL Development, Heeton Homes and Kim Seng Heng Realty, had planned for a higher number of smaller units in order to churn out a larger number of new homes.

HIghpark ResidencesMost of the sales were for the two-bedders which are sized between 53 to 68 sq m (up to or smaller than the size of an older resale three-room HDB flat) and priced from $398, 000 for the record-setting smallest 36 sq m studio apartment in District 28. There were also three-bedders available at 81 to 92 sq m, and various other unit configurations such as four-, five-bedroom apartments, 10 semi-detached houses, 4 bungalows and 9 commercial units. But at the weekend launch, affordability was the key word, with most units under $400,000 being snapped up quickly.

Though the quickest sales were of these smaller units, property analysts are hopeful that the area will be developed for families in the future and as it will be some time before the next private residential property enters the market in this area, High Park Residences may hold its place in terms of demand and pricing for some time.

Singapore home prices down last quarter

Across the board, property prices have dipped again last quarter, but resale HDB flat prices may be stabilising. Following the first quarter decline of 1 per cent, resale HDB flat prices dipped only 0.4 per cent last quarter, possibly signifying a bottoming out of this market.

Optima condominium at Tanah Merah.

Optima condominium at Tanah Merah.

Nudged by the lowered mortgage servicing ratio cap from 35 to 30 per cent and reduction in the number of new BTO (build-to-order) and SBF (sale of balance flats) units, HDB resale flat prices have fallen for a few quarters now. Property analysts are expecting a stabilising of the market, or at least a rise in demand for resale units as HDB plans to increase the income ceiling for BTO flats, which may replenish the pool of potential resale HDB flat buyers.

Private home prices are however expected to fall further this year, especially as resale HDB flat prices have fallen so quickly the gap between private suburban homes and the former have widened. Some HDB upgraders may think twice about selling their HDB flat to purchase a private condominium unit and others may turn to resale flats instead of private homes. The expectation of a rush of new private apartment units to hit the market in the later half of this year may have also put a damper on market prices.

In the first quarter, private home prices fell 1 per cent, and the fall remained steady in the second quarter at 0.9 per cent. Moving ahead, prices of private non-landed homes are expected to fall 4 to 6 per cent by the end of the year.

 

Fewer new private property launches

Despite lower sales of new private home last month, the percentage of sales based on the number of units launched, was positive.

The lower sales figure was mainly due to the lack of new property launches. But the take-up rate of the 499 units launched was at a happy 128 per cent in May. The take-up rate was only 84 per cent in May this year, compared to 82 per cent in April 2014. Considering the 21 per cent fall in sales in the first 5 months of this year, the leap last month is a promising sign.

HighparkResidencesLeading the sales were suburban launches at Botanique at Bartley, Northpark Residences in Yishun and The Panorama in Ang Mo Kio. Median selling prices were $1,232 psf at The Panorama, $1,292 psf at Botanique at Bartley and $1,397 psf at Northpark Residences. Competitive pricing may have lowered prices on some newer launches and this could have attracted buyers back into the market. There were even reports of private funds or group of investors who have picked up 16 units at 111 Emerald Hill.

In the months ahead, the number of new property launches will remain low, which may in turn affect figures. But instead of looking at across-the-board figures, sussing out potential deals in previous launches which are re-launchning new units could be the way to get ahead of the pack. Upcoming launches to look forward to are Gramercy Park in Grange Road and High Park Residences in Fernvale.

Private resale home prices stabilising

With minimal fall in prices over the previous couple of quarters, could this be a sign that resale private property prices are stabilising? Could buyers be getting used to the current home prices and are coming back to pick up deals before a possible rise? Will the predictions of a 4 to 8 per cent drop in property prices this year continue on its track or will buyers buck the trend?

Botanique@BartleyThe NUS Singapore Residential Price Index (SRPI) has indicated a 2.2 per cent fall in resale condominium prices over the last 12 months. But since the first quarter of 2015, the fall has been more gradual and marginal, considering the expected 5 per cent year-on-year fall in prices per month in the last quarter of 2014. The next couple of months could be the watershed for the property market. A slow and small drop in prices could indicate a possible bottoming out of the market.

Part of the reason for last month’s 0.1 per cent fall in April could also be due to the high transaction volume. The recent new property launches of Botanique at Bartley and Northpark Residences may also have had a trickle-down effect on the resale market, in particular properties in the proximity of these 2 launches. Another promising bit of news is the 0.4 per cent rise in the prices of small apartment units up to 506 sq ft. A much untested market, particularly in the suburbs, as more commercial businesses move out of the central region and into the heartlands, the demand for these units may change in the next few years.

Offers galore in blossoming EC market

Executive condominium launches in the recent months haev proved attractive to the buying crowd, especially after years of quiet on the ground.

But with 7 more launches planned for the later part of the year, will the market be poised for a saturation point? Or will buyers welcome the competition and options? Most of the new launches will be near existing EC sites in the North and North-east regions, which could mean stiffer competition for the developers.

Westwood ResidencesOne project which may however prove promising is the Westwood Residences in Boon Lay. Together with Lake Life EC, they could the only 2 executive condominiums in Jurong since 2010. The rarity, coupled with the pent-up demand could means buyers may be willing to pay slightly higher than average prices for units here as compared to ECs elsewhere. Property experts are expecting the median prices for ECs launched later this year to hover between $750 to $770 psf.

Currently, the average selling prices for ECs are at around $800 psf. But buyers have not been particularly responsive to this pricing level and with the introduction of thousands of new units over this and next year could bring the competition higher and prices lower. The dip in resale HDB and private condominium prices since the high in 2013, would also mean that ECs have to priced realistically in order to entice HDB upgraders and buyers.

As the market segments react to one another, the EC being hybrid between private and public properties, may also find themselves having to price themselves appropriately between these two market segments.

 

The private home gentle wave

It’s an up and down ride for the private non-landed property market for more than a year now. Across the board, non-landed resale home prices dropped 6.2 per cent last year. Prices of homes in the central districts dipped an average of 7 per cent last year, though there were good months when some segments managed to bounce back slightly before falling again. That could mean that things were mainly level though there are outliers.

Duchess ResidencesResale private apartment prices fell 0.2 per cent last month, with a 3.9 per cent fall compared to the same month last year. But some city fringe properties bounced back with an average price rise of 0.4 per cent. Part of the yoyo-ing in prices could be due to the Chinese New Year period in February and buyers were just coming back into the fray in March.

The second quarter of this year would be a crucial point in almost determining how the rest of the year will flow, at least up to just before the Hungry Ghost month. Though the ride has been more a gentle wave of price fluctuations rather than a roller coaster ride, property experts are however not expecting a drastic change in prices unless there are major policy changes or a major interest rates hike.

The year could be a relatively quiet one with bright sparks and dull moments along the way, but the basics of good location and lowered total quantum prices will still move units.

Yishun no backwater town

A somewhat laid back atmosphere that speaks of a slow and nature-filled life with occasional bursts of activity and energy describes the fringe township of Yishun. This HDB estate once was called “Ulu” (a Singaporean slang for being out-of-the-way and backward), but it has progressed nicely into the genteel gem it is today.

It seems to live life just the edge, growing and filling in a gap that straddles bustling and slow. Latest news of the redevelopment of the Yishun Central, with Frasers Centrepoint Homes taking the lead in building a mixed-use condominium and mall development, Northpoint City, in the vicinity, the Yishun area may be seeing a revival of sorts.

The EstuaryStretching out in a large area between Chong Pang, Sembawang and Yio Chu Kang, it has quite the space for development and expansion. Some of the current private properties already in its midst include Orchid Park, Lilydale and The Estuary. Newer residential developments include Nine Residences, Symphony Suites and the recently launched Northpark Residences.

There are a considerable number of HDB flats in the area as well, and property prices are considered reasonable and affordable. For now. New BTO (Build-to-Order) flats were also introduced into the mix starting from 2013, putting a good 9,500 units in the estate, including Yishun Greenwalk, DBSS ADora Green and Vista Spring.

From kampung to new town. The kampung spirit remains strong.

Fall in resale private property prices

Buyers and property investors are becoming increasingly wary of the influx of new properties into the market, rising interest rates, the unchanged Additional Buyers’ Stamp Duty (ABSD) and the Total Debt Ratio Framework (TDSR). Resale private non-landed home sales figures indicated a 1.6 per cent drop in January.

Although buyers are still buying properties, demand and selling prices may not be as high as before. Smaller units seem to be more popular as the total quantum prices of these compact apartments are usually more palatable.

According to the SRPI (Singapore Residential Price Index) compiled by the National University of Singapore Sims Urban Oasis1(NUS), prices of non-landed private homes in the central area were hit the hardest with a 1.9 per cent decline. However, this could mean that the price gap between homes in the central and suburban areas are closing, the rate of decline for the former may be less steep.

Despite the popularity of smaller units with buyers of late, shoebox apartment sales fell 0.6 per cent in February. Developers are also aware of buyers’ preferences for a new unit over a resale one especially with buyers who are intending to purchase a private property for own-occupation purposes.

Moving ahead, property analysts are expecting resale non-landed private property prices to drop by 5 to 7 per cent this year.