Hong Kong’s property prices expected to rise further

As one of Asia’s, if not the world’s, most expensive cities to live and work in, it comes as no surprise that the real estate in Hong Kong is one of the world’s costliest.

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Photo credit: www.onekt.com.hk

Despite the Hong Kong government‘s repeated attempts to cool the market, with implementation of stamp duties and laying down of other purchasing restrictions, property prices in Hong Kong have continued to climb. And things could be heating up even more this year as even Mr Li Ka Shing, the country’s richest man, predicts the market still have room for property prices to climb further. In November last year, private property prices reached a peak unseen since 1979 when the data was made available by the city’s rating and valuation department.

Although there has been some political unrest, mostly civil, in the city and interest rates have been on the rise, there is still space apparently, for slight rise in prices this year. It will not be a smooth ride up, but there will be increments made nonetheless. China Overseas Land and Investment for example has listed the prices of their latest private residential development in the former Kai Tak airport area for almost 20 per cent higher that the same which were sold in August. In a city where liveable land is scarce, developers have been known to pay exorbitant prices for land sites, for example the record ids for sites in the same Kai Tak airport area for US$1.8 billion or S$2.58 billion.

 

Hong Kong’s property market strong despite cooling measures

Unlike Singapore where the public housing sector is strong and almost 80 per cent of the population lives in a Housing Board (HDB) flat, in Hong Kong only 21 per cent live in a public housing unit and even then, it takes them a minimum of 3 years for a successful application. Though both cities have large population, the density is higher in Hong Kong where land restrictions are greater and unlike Singapore, they hardly have means of reclaiming land and expanding liveable space vertically is one of their only solutions. It comes as no surprise then, that unit sizes and liveable floor areas are shrinking.

hongkongpropertyMany could say that Hong Kong’s real estate fluctuations is very much like its undulating terrains, with steep climbs and equally slippery downhill slopes. Property cooling measures were rolled out in Hong Kong in 2012, around the same time as curbs were implemented in Singapore as well. But it still takes an average Hong Kong household 19 years to save up enough to purchase their own home compared to the 5 years for a Singaporean household.

Though property prices did fall in February, they rebounded to the levels comparable to 2015’s peak in September this year, possibly indicating renewed interest in Hong Kong real estate from mainland buyers. Numbers seem to show that more mainland Chinese are favouring Hong Kong properties over Singapore properties, possibly since Singapore’s property market has been seeing consecutive quarters of muted growth since last year.