Property cooling curbs working in China

Many Asian-pacific countries have placed property cooling curbs on their housing and real estate industry as prices climbed rapidly within the past half a decade. Cities such as Hong Kong, Tokyo, Sydney, Melbourne, Beijing, Shanghai and Singapore are facing not only space and housing issues but also rapid inflation and increasing property prices.

Aerial view of suburban neighborhood, Wuhan, Hubei, China on 11th March 2016. (Photo by Jie Zhao/Corbis via Getty Images)

Aerial view of suburban neighborhood, Wuhan, Hubei, China on 11th March 2016. (Photo by Jie Zhao/Corbis via Getty Images)

The Chinese government has been placing curbs upon curbs on their real estate industry, with perhaps conflicting sentiments as the sector accounts for a large part of the country’s economic growth. But housing prices have been skyrocketing at an alarming rate and for the first time in the past few years, the measures seem to be taking effect.

In Shenzhen, currently the country’s hottest market for new homes, property prices have fallen 0.5 per cent after consecutive dips over the past 4 months. In Shanghai, prices fell by 0.1 per cent, also following a 3-consecutive-month decline. While prices remained unchanged in Beijing, the stabilisation is a start to possible price deflation. News of a possible reduction of land release by more than 3 times that released in 2016 could further reign in price increase.

Park yoho venezia Hong Kong propertyThe price-increase in January was reflected in the smallest number of cities in a year. Home prices have fallen in 20 cities while 45 out of 70 cities saw a gain in prices, down from 46 in December last year. Part of the reason could be the curbs placed not only on buyers but also on banks. Some bank branches in major Chinese cities such as Beijing, Guangzhou and Chongqing have recently increased mortgage rates for first-time buyers. China’s central bank is likely to have even stricter restrictions on credit and housing loans put in place, in particular targeting developers and households, in order to prevent a property bubble.

 

China’s top-tier cities post continued growth

2016 has been quite the year for China’s property sector. With property booms in top-tier cities such as Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen, overall investment in the country’s real estate rose by 6.9% last year.

chinaSince the property sector is one of China’s main sources of economic growth, and her economy did grow by 6.7% last year, fuelling 40 other main business sectors in the country, economists, the China government would no doubt hope for continued success this year. But there have been concerns that the pressure on the property bubble is building up and might be reaching bursting point.

Despite the government’s attempts to cool the market with rapid and frequent policy changes over the past couple of years, property investment growth has hit a 11.1 per cent high last December, up from the 5.7 per cent in the month before. Though home prices in some cities have began to fall slightly, analysts are seeing that market sentiments are hardly sensitive to policy shifts. Should the policies stick, any significant changes will only come with time. As most investors consider property-ownership the most feasible and desirable means of adding to their income, demand in top-tier cities remain high despite soft price growth.

GuosonCentreRecent shifts on the international front however may mean continued growth in the real estate market within China as more investors look inward, what with the Trump administration turning things on its head with his trade agreements changes. It may be in the government’s interest to acquire land revenue while keeping an eye on a burgeoning real estate sector which on the plus side will boost economic growth but may cause bigger issues later on if allowed to continue on its upward trajectory.

China’s property explosion slows only slightly

There has been fear of a bubble growing in China’s property market but as property prices fell  in some of China’s top and second-tier cities this month, the fears may be slightly allayed as it seems to indicate that the curbs which authorities have put in place are starting to work.

Property analysts have however reported a change in focus for some mainland buyers to Hong Kong as skyrocketing property prices and cooling measures put some off.

HongKong The AltitudeThe property market in China is one of the country’s main source of revenue growth, and while the authorities may want to prevent a bubble from bursting, they are also put to task to keep the economy alive. China’s economic growth of 6.7 per cent in Q3 was largely dependent on its real estate industry. Recent curbs include larger down payments and restrictions on multiple property ownerships. But the low interest rates offered by China banks have kept the buyers coming. Though the rates have remained unchanged since October 2015, it has been cut 6 times prior.

While new home prices in Beijing fell 3.7 per cent and 2.5 per cent in Shanghai, some may consider this a market cooling. But the average new home prices across 70 cities have shown a record surge last month, the highest in 7 years, with a 1.8 per cent rise from August.

 

Property prices in China continue to climb

Earlier in the year, China’s government laid down new regulations in an attempt to avert a property bubble, but if last month’s 33 per cent year-on-year increase in home value is anything to go by, they may have to do a whole lot more to prevent the real estate industry from travelling dangerously down the path of no return.

chinaProperty prices rose 1.2 per cent in August in 70 Chinese cities, not only in major cities such as Shanghai and Shenzhen but also in regional cities. Last year, the Chinese government relaxed rules on foreigners purchasing properties in China, and despite a slowing economy, property prices have continued to rise. Unrealistically? Perhaps. In Shanghai and Beijing alone, prices have risen 4.4 and 3.6 per cent respectively. In Shenzhen and Guangzhou, home values rose as well at 2.1 and 2.4 per cent respectively. Previously, only the first and second-tier cities had to grapple with sky-rocketing property prices, but the effect may have trickled down to cities of various tiers.

Property analysts are certain however, that as long as land supply remains stagnant and loans are fairly easily attained, the rise will continue. Previous curbs have yet to made a significant impact on the industry and as long as supply remains lower than demand, property prices will continue to climb.