More transparency with Property prices

The Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) has recently hinted that even clearer property transaction price trends will be provided publicly come 2015. Within the first half of the year, property players, the buying public, and even policymakers will be able to get their hands on prices of individual units in developer-sold properties.
URA 2

Photo credit: Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA).

This may level the playing field as currently, even though median prices of units in each residential project is shown on the URA website, only when units have been purchased, and only those with caveats lodged with the URA will have their prices disclosed.

Part of the reason for the change could be the fact that more developers have been offering discounts and rebates of sorts on new units, ever since the cooling measures kicked in, which meant affordability have decreased and total quantum value has now become the new unit of measurement. As these discounts are often not registered in the caveats, the prices disclosed may not paint the entire picture.
iProperty price transaction page

Source: iProperty.com.sg

Buyers may be able to now better negotiate their deals instead of relying on developers’ statistics. How will this impact the market and while transparency is a mature way of moving forward, will developers be able to withstand the continued price decline? Or perhaps the question would be, how long more before prices hit the bottom of the curve and begin its upward climb?

Glimmer of hope for Private resale homes?

Although the total number of private resale homes sold were lower in October than September, prices have begun to rise slightly. According to latest data, non-landed private home prices rose 0.4 per cent in last month. In suburban districts often popular with buyers such as Bishan, Toa Payoh, Little India, Geylang and Queenstown, prices rose 0.6 per cent. Transactions and prices of prime district properties however remained quiet, falling in fact by 0.3 per cent.

Okio Residences in Balestier.

Okio Residences in Balestier.

Have overall property prices fallen sufficiently? And have they reached the lowest point of the property cycle? If so, how long will this low point last? Private property prices have been low for quite some time now, maintaining a steady level in terms of pricing and transaction volume for almost half a year. The government has said that they will not relax the cooling measures anytime soon, perhaps in fear of a huge and quick rebound which may bring prices up even higher than before the curbs were put in place. They could also be giving the measures a bit more time to sink in, to further bring down home prices and getting the industry and public used to these measures.

Property experts are expecting prices to decline even further in the short term. Would this be the best time to invest? And how would you go about investing? Is it best to move away from residential property into commercial property? Or are there certain property types with hidden long term value?

When will property cooling measures cool off ?

The past two years have seen the implementation, and perhaps effects, of a series of property cooling measures. From increased stamp duties to revised subsidies and the strictest of which, the TDSR (total debt servicing ratio) framework, restrictions have certainly risen the heat on the property industry.

Singapore still has some way to go before the property market achieves the sophistication it requires to reach new heights. Economist are estimating the second half of 2015 as the earliest the authorities are likely to cool off with the cooling measures. That is when most households would have managed to reduce their debt levels. However, property prices can be expected to fall by more than 10 per cent in the first half of next year, or at least show a substantial decline before curbs are removed. In fact, by 2016, property prices are expected to fall by up to 20 per cent due to the oversupply at that time.

Prices have stablised somewhat since the implementation of the property cooling measures, but the fall has only be about 3 per cent, which means the authorities could be waiting for a significant fall in figures, or a recession, before amending the rules. The fear could be the sudden upward rebound of prices which may far surpass the watershed of 2009. With the elections coming in 2016, 2015 seems like the turning point for the market and buyers and sellers alike may be watching closely to catch any opportunities  they can before things change once more.

Could 2015 be the year for home buyers? How will landlords, developers and sellers fare?

Private property out of reach for HDB Upgraders?

If home prices are falling, most would think that the upgrade from public housing or HDB flats to the private home market should be getting easier. But it seems the opposite is true.

Prices of HDB flats and a private condominium apartment are perhaps softening at around the same rate, or that of HDB flats possibly even quicker. This creates a widening price gap between resale HDB flats and private condominiums, and HDB sellers can no longer depend on the sales proceeds of their HDB flats to balance out the price of their new private condominium.

BellewoodsECPhoto Credit: Bellewoodsec.com

Does this also mean that more HDB flat owners will now be forced to stay put and thus decrease the number of HDB flats available in the resale market? What about those who may have already purchase a private property and have a limited time period within which to sell their HDB flats? WIll they be pushed to sell at lower prices hence suffering the growing amount they need to top up?

Property experts are expecting ECs or executive condominiums to be the bridging properties between these two markets. As a hybrid between public and private housing, buyers qualify for public housing subsidies but after a 10-year period, can sell their units as private properties.  There is also the question of home sizes, will HDB upgraders be willing to settle for lesser space and a higher psf price to make the leap from HDB to private home?

New Thomson MRT Line will benefit East Coast residents

Not only will property owners in the North reap the benefits of the new stations of the up-and-coming Thomson MRT line, but those in the East Coast will also see the value of their properties rise in the long run as the new MRT stations run through Tanjong Rhu, Katong Park, Marine Terrace, Siglap, Bayshore, Bedok and Sungei Bedok.

LTA - TELPhoto credit: Land Transport Authority (LTA)

The Thomson-East Coast Line (TEL) will connect more areas in the Northern and Eastern parts of the country to the city centre and cut travel time considerably. There are a number of exclusive and boutique private residential properties in the East as it has been a popular area for expatriates, but a boost is expected when the TEL commences service in 2019. Property analysts are already expecting a 5 to 10 per cent rise in property prices, if the response to the North-east Line (NEL) stations are anything to go by. And upon completion of the MRT line, they foresee a rise of up to 12 per cent.

Some of the properties which may enjoy the most out of the announced realignment of the TEL includes condominium developments in the Tanjong Rhu area such as Casuarina Cove, Tanjong Ria, Meyer Residence, The Belvedere and Water Place. Properties nearer the already existing Bedok and Tanah Merah mrt stations may not see as significant a change.

Marine BlueNearer Siglap and Bayshore are private apartments such as Lagoon View, Laguna Park, Elliot at East Coast, Bayshore Park, The Bayshore and Costa Del Sol. Cote D’Azur, The Palladium and The Seaview along Marine Parade could also see a rise in home prices in the future.

How will developers price new properties in the area which have yet to launch? Will they release units are higher prices or will they keep to the current market values? New launches coming up include the 124-unit Marine Blue and 109-unit Amber Skye.

Property market slump continues

Resale home sales and rental prices have continued to soften as we reach the middle of Q3. July proved to be rather quiet for the resale private home market as prices reached a 21-month low, according to the Singapore Real Estate Exchange (SRX) figures.

LakevilleAs more new private properties reached their completion dates and entered the rental market, the number of units for rent increased, which caused the rental market to become more competitive. And as immigration rules tightened, the supply and demand scale tipped in favor of tenants. Rental prices were at a 38-month low last month. And the blow is felt not only in the private property market but also the HDB resale market with prices dropping to a 30-month low in July.

The areas with the largest price decline is the city center, with prices dropping 4 per cent. This is followed by the city fringe areas with a 1.1 per cent dip and the suburban districts with a 0.6 per cent drop. Property experts say that the drop in rental prices could be one of the reasons contributing to the slipping resale prices.

With property prices so closely linked to immigration policies in this small nation, how will the authorities balance the issues of housing and population?

$1 million sweet spot for home prices

The average affordability ceiling for properties have dropped by almost $200,000 ever since the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) placed curbs on loans. The average price home buyers can now afford, or are willing to fork out, is $1 million. Properties between the total quantum range of $800,000 to $1. 2 million generally sit better with buyers. The range used to be wider, with homes reaching $1.4 million selling just as well.

LakevilleDevelopers have been quick to realize the shift and have been offering considerable discounts or competitive pricing for new launches. Smaller units such as studio apartments and one- or two-bedders have also performed better than their larger counterparts. About 8,254 homes priced between $700,000 and $1.2 million were sold during the last year. Properties which were offering more affordable units, such as the Coco Palms in Pasir Ris which launched units at $980 psf, were able to garner more sales.

And for buyers hoping to secure a home below $500,000 there are now more available, and more sold. In the last year, 291 units below $500,000 were sold from June 2013 to June 2014. Comparing to the year before, only 61 units were sold within the same time frame. Buyers consider smaller units easier for both occupier and rental purposes, plus most HDB upgraders rate affordability of homes as between $900,000 to $1 million.

T.D.S.R – What it means for the property market?

Total Debt Servicing Ratio. Or Total Damage to Singapore Residential as some industry players would put it?

The real estate sector is in a little bit of a sway at the moment. With the situation tilting this way then the other every other month, the outlook is clearly unclear. The latest loan curbs seem to be taking its toll on the property market, with a reported 73 per cent drop in sales in July, following an already considerable drop of 65 per cent in June.

Kensington SquareNot surprising at all since the immediate effect is that it is not as easy as before to borrow. Loan approval times have lengthened and loan amounts are restricted. Although sales are still happening, buyers are no longer able to commit to purchase as quickly as before. Unlike January’s measure which increased the Additional Buyer’s Stamp Duty (ABSD) percentage, developers are unable or have yet to find ways to soften the blow for their buyers.

But despite the sudden plunge in new home sales, industry experts are not worrying excessively over the numbers as it may be too early yet to tell if the effects will stick. With this month being the Hungry Ghost month, they are not expecting a sudden lift in sales. They are hoping to see a strong rebound in October when new properties will be launched once more.

And as home prices continue to rise, response from the market in the upcoming months may also be a good indicator of how resilient the market is and whether the pool of buyers  and renters will continue to grow.